book titles

Cinder

http://animoto.com/play/F9TTPFzdGISga5S1Gz1xyw

Check out this book trailer by the Platte Public Librarian Miranda Brumbaugh.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer, a book based on a fairy tale–Cinderella–with a sci-fi twist. Think dystopian in the vein of The Hunger Games and Divergent.

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Public Libraries and the Ebook War: The Big Six Finally Caved

E-Books and DemocracyFinally!

Public libraries will now have access to books published by the Big Six publishers: Penguin Group, Simon & Schuster, Hachette, Macmillan, Random House and HarperCollins.

What does this mean for you? If you are a library patron who has a eBook lending card for South Dakota Titles to Go, then you may finally be able to read your favorite authors on your eReader device.

“Negotiations between the nation’s libraries and the Big Six publishers… which publish roughly two-thirds of the books in America — have gone in fits and starts. Today Hachette, which had been a holdout, is joining the others in announcing that it will make e-books available to public libraries.”
Here is the rest of the story:

“E-Books and Democracy” The New York Times

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The Good House, by Ann Leary

Would you like to see this book at your Platte Public Library? Leave a comment below!

Blogging for a Good Book

houseOf all the villains in modern literature, Daisy Buchanan has always been one I love to hate. As F. Scott Fitzgerald describes her, she’s so insulated from the world and from the consequences of her actions that she has no sense of right and wrong, and there’s no one willing to hold her to account. And that’s when she was surrounded by her social peers. Imagine if she lived in an ordinary place with ordinary people.

Hildy Good is (or was) the top-selling real estate broker in her seaside town. The town has been discovered by Boston’s wealthy, land and house prices have skyrocketed, and the quirky old-time residents are trying to hang on in the face of the invasion. The McAllisters, one of the newcomer families, have profited enormously by Brian’s management of a hedge fund (and other money-making silent partnerships), but they’re regular folks and Hildy is…

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Grave Mercy

This looks interesting! Anyone read this or would like to see at Platte Public Library?

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Top Ten Favorite Romances

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Order of Darkness: Changeling by Philippa Gregory Book Review

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Top Ten Dystopian Characters

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Prisoner B-3087 by Alan Gratz Book Review

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Book Club Picks for February-March

Our library book club, open to all individuals in the community, will meet on March 18 at 7 pm at the Platte Public Library. The books up for discussion include The Book Thief and Sarah’s Key. Both of these books are based on World War II with a focus on the Nazis in Europe. We are looking forward to an interesting discussion!

These books are available at the Platte Public Library. Also, you can check out The Book Thief on the OverDrive program with South Dakota Titles to Go. If you haven’t signed up for this eBook lending program, contact your librarians today so you can start checking out books on your eReader!

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Let’s Go Hugo! by Angela Dominguez

BrodartVibe

9780803738645 hugoHugo is not your typical bird.  He prefers the ground and doesn’t fly (and no, he’s not a penguin).  Set in the beautiful backdrop of Paris, Hugo is working on his masterpiece of the Eiffel Tower.  Lulu, a bird passing by, stopped to admire his work and told Hugo that she knew what he was making and that she knew where it was.  Lulu wanted him to fly with her to see it.  Hugo, not liking to fly, begins plotting to stall.

He suggests that they walk around the park first.  While there, they indulge in some popcorn, play in a water fountain and watch a ballet.  Throughout their day, Lulu keeps asking Hugo if he’s ready to go.  Night falls and Lulu points out that if they want to see the Tower, they really need to go soon.  Hugo says that it’s too dangerous to fly at night and…

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The Word ‘Hobbit’

Interesting Literature

The word ‘hobbit’ was supposedly invented by J. R. R. Tolkien. This fact both is and is not true. To explain why this is the case (or isn’t the case) we must do a bit of delving into the world of witchcraft …

hobbit1Tolkien’s book was published in 1937, but since the first part of the film has recently come out, the present moment seems like a good time to reflect upon the word that features in the title of Tolkien’s book. So where did it come from? The famous story is that Tolkien, while marking some of his students’ papers in Oxford one day, came to a blank sheet which had not a single word written on it. Out of nowhere – or so it seemed – he had a flash of inspiration, and hastily scribbled down the sentence, ‘In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.’ That line…

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New Books In!

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We’ve got some great new books in this week. Come by and check out the selection! You’ll find plenty of reading to snuggle up to this holiday when you aren’t busy baking gingerbread men or wrapping gifts.

 

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New Books! New Books at the Library!

Attention! Attention! We have several new and exciting titles at the library. Check it out!

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Time for a study in Shakespeare…Cheers and happy autumn!

A Cheery Beggar

Fallen leaves dry and crunch in the cool mornings. Night comes quicker and crisper. Autumn approaches. ‘Tis the season for Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73.

This post will provide a close reading of Sonnet 73. “Close reading” a work means carefully considering the sounds and structures and senses of language that the writer chooses to convey his meaning. Shakespeare’s Sonnet 73 is one of the richest works I’ve encountered, and its imagery fits perfectly into this fall season.

First, here’s some background on the sonnet form:

Sonnets are tightly structured rhyming poems that traditionally speak about love. The term “sonnet” comes from the Italian sonetto which means “little song.” Sonnets first appeared around 1200 and were popularized by Francesco Petrarch (born in Tuscany in 1304). In an Italian or ‘Petrarchan’ sonnet, the first eight lines present some problem and the last six lines offer a solution. A shift or turn between problem…

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